Category Archives: Korea

Best of 2017 (in photos)

Previous years: 2009, 2010, 2011,  2012201320142015, and 2016.

The Best Of 2017

Saddle Mountain

This year was spent pretty evenly split between South Korea and the US, though I did little traveling other than that. I was able to get to beautiful places like the redwoods and the coast and Seoraksan and Mt. St. helens.

This was a year of enjoying friends and family and local nature. Next year, perhaps, will be a  bit more adventurous.  (I also need to get a better camera–currently using my 2013 phone and it isn’t exactly killing it on the photo front.)

January 2017

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January – One reason I love Seoul is for it’s habit of constantly rewards aimless wanders with the unexpected. On this snowy winter day, nahid and I found a giant trash pile on top of a mountain (next to an exercise area and a path to the peak, naturally). What’s the story here? Who knows!


February 2017

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February – Despite visiting quite a few temples (& working at Hwagyesa for a year) and frequently going to Insadong, I was late to discover Jogyesa. Which was pretty dumb of me. It’s got a lot going for it and is great to wander through during all four seasons.


March 2017

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March – In March I came back to the US. Korea is of course known for  벚꽃 (beotkkot, cherry blossom) but spring in Portland is no slouch either. This walk on the Willamette, with my sister and brother, was very reminiscent of visiting Yeoido in Seoul only with a fraction of the crowds.


April 2017

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may 17 6April – A double picture month! The first one was taken on the Long Beach peninsula in Washington, where we did our best to recreate a photo from the summer of 1995.

I had to include that. But the trio of tents was a celebration of another anniversary–my 30th birthday hike with Craig and Garrett along Lake Chelan. We hoped to recreate that with another decent hike but logistically couldn’t. Instead we camped between the redwoods and the beach, which wasn’t too bad a compromise.


May 2017

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May – Already summer in Korea, I took several long walks.  This picture is from a long walk with my friend Luka, where we began at Olympic Park and then walked 20k along the river.


June 2017

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JuneHwaseong Fortress is not all there is in Suwon, but it’s always been my favorite part of it. This time I went to meet my friend Praveen. We walked around the fortress walls before eating Indian and then heading to his place for a board game.


July 2017

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July I have been to Seoraksan many times and it’s long been my favorite place in Korea. This trip, with Nahid, Praveen, John and Alison (the latter three who had never been before) was during the soggy monsoon season. Very wet, yes, but the fewest people I’ve ever seen there as well.


August 2017

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August– Back in Portland just in time for the Soapbox derby. You can’t help but like the creative DIY that leads to entries like the Catbus.


September 2017

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September – Staying on Tabor,  I snapped this view of the reservoir on a walk with my brother. We met my sister at Quarterworld after and played some epic Mario Kart.


October 2017

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October – Sauvie Island is a gloomy place in the mist and I like that these scattered pumpkins have a ghostly feel to them.


November 2017

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November – Sure, it’s just a traffic cone in an over-ambitious mud puddle. But a) I was on my way to hang with friends Craig and Martina at Orycon and b) this part of the month is that perfect liminal state between fall and winter.


December 2017

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December – Walking to meet my sister and mom at the Portland Night Market, I was able to get this shot of the wintry sunset.

 

 

Yeti Hikes: Dragonfly Mountain

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Distance: 8 km Time: 2 hours

Built in 2014 in an obscure part of the city, the trail that ascends Dragonfly Mountain (not its proper name, of course) wends past apartment buildings and Buddhist temples alike.

You discover it quite by mistake, first by ascending a long set of stairs that you had never noticed before and then by ascending more stairs. Suddenly you are above the city, looking out at the Han River and Namsan. A Korean woman will chat with you for a bit, explaining that when she was a child there was no smog and everything looked a lot closer.

There is major construction on one end of Dragonfly mountain. They’ve destroyed many old buildings and it looks like a new apartment building is going up. Less than 500 meters from that hole in the earth is a modest Buddhist temple (apart from the Golden Buddha statue of course), guarded by a dog and a friendly homeless man with a dog of his own who offers to share his makkoli with you.

There’s no stopping though and your feet carry you forward, past ceramic tiles painted with images of Deadpool and Totoro, Kakao and Pixar characters alike. You may pause at the workout equipment–do pull-ups or sit-ups or any of another dozen exercises. Should you continue, fear not–there will be plenty more stations along the way.

You walk through grass and through what feels like jungle and, later, a gloomy forest. There are side trails down to apartments on one side and the city on the other. This is part of the city you have never been to, and the lull to explore somewhere new is strong, but you continue along Dragonfly mountain.

You pass the trail to another Buddhist temple, this one half-hidden in dense verdant foliage. Now you see a dome that looks like an observatory. But it’s really an emergency services– 119. Just past here the trail forks, and you eschew the paved road and climb again, past what appears to be a deserted university and up a flight of stairs that keep climbing long after the novelty has worn off.

You reach a badminton court, skirt around it, and find a wooden platform with a view of the city stretching all around you. Below is a wooden swing and a rose garden.  There are no elves frolicking in the garden, but you think that there probably should be.

The trail splits again, and again, and you emerge by a subway station. It’s not a long walk back to your house, however, and thus you finish the trek amongst a myriad of people. Dragonfly Mountain, so close to you, is no longer visible; hidden behind rows of apartment buildings and smog.

It matters not. You know you will return. In the meantime…

Your memories look like this: